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Sunday, 3 March 2013

The Celto-Germanic Hyperborean Origin of the Graal Quest

In my articles from 23/2/13 and 10/2/13-Gar, Woden-Parsifal`s Graal Rune and The Graal Runes of the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc I referred once more to the Sacred Hallows of the Hyperborean Tuatha De Danann. These hallows are also to be found again symbolically in the Arthurian cycle of myths. We will recall that there are four clear elements to the Arthurian cycle: the sword Excalibur, the stone from which Arthur pulled it, the quest for the Graal[which is represented by a chalice which originally would have been a horn[the Calc Rune]and Parsifal`s spear which is closely associated with the Graal. The sword Excalibur is of course the sword of the God Nuada Airgetlam[silver hand or arm], the first king of the Tuatha. The sword`s name[all swords of any importance in Celtic and Germanic mythology had names]was Claiomh Solais-The Sword of Light. This sword was inherited by Arthur as a symbol of His kingship-divine kingship that is which places Arthur or Ar-Thor in a mythological rather than an historical context. The Tyr Rune symbolises both the sword and spear which are both symbols of divine kingship amongst the Celto-Germanic peoples. The stone from which Arthur pulled the sword is the Lia Fail of the Tuatha, the Stone of Destiny, used for the crowning of monarchs in Tara. This hallow is represented by the Stan Rune. The Cauldron of the Dagda is the origin in part of the concept of the Graal as a cup or chalice. Of course the Graal is also represented as a green stone, evident from Wolfram von Eschenbach`s Parzival. The Graal is symbolised by the Calc Rune, the horn being a precursor to the cup or chalice, being eventually outlawed by the church for its `heathen` associations. The Spear of Lugh which is also Gungnir, the Spear of Woden is inherited by the Aryan Kristos Parsifal and is represented by the Gar Rune, the Gift of Ing, the Spear of Divine Genetic Inheritance! The fact that there is a continuing thread that links the Celtic, Arthurian and Germanic traditions together is surely evidence of the common Aryan origin of the Graal mythos? The exoteric search for the Graal and its accompanying hallows-the spear, stone and sword is the external form of the inner quest to recover the lost northern, polar, Thulean, Solar and Hyperborean wisdom, the inheritance of the Arya.

4 comments:

Welsh Mythology said...

I'm assuming this is your flight of inspiration presented so thoroughly here? If not, the etymological explanation of some of your names here are found in their Welsh roots. Arthur's name, him being originaly a Welsh mythological figure, breakes down to Arth-ur, which means Golden Bear. The original name of Excalibur is Caledfwlch according to the Welsh source myth.

Wotans Krieger said...

Perhaps you are new to reading my blogs or you would not have made such a basic error in assuming that my articles are to do with etymology rather than mythological symbolism.
As you will see from this and my other two related blogs-Aryan Myth and Metahistory and Die Armanenschaft der Ariogermanen what I am concerned with is identifying common underlying Aryan mythological constructs. I am well aware of the `bear` associations with Arthur but there are other folk-etymological associations which are in my opinion equally valid from a differing perspective. Ar-Thor is in fact a prextian pan-Aryan sun God whose identity may still be discerned in the work of Mallory.L.A. Waddell wrote concerning Aryan Thor:Ar-Thor in his groundbreaking work-British Edda and this is where the concept is derived from. Please read this work and then return with a more informed opinion!

Welsh Mythology said...

Thanks for the reply Wotans. Yes, I have read Waddell and his ideas are interesting, but I don't see how this is a valid interpretation. These are very different traditions, and although there is obvious influence in some places (Gwydion / Wotan maybe being the clearest) there is still very little to back these ideas up. Lots of words have been written about it, but it still doesn't make it more probable. I respect the fact that this is your interest, but I still have an opinion, and a sense of responsibility for trying to preserve a degree of integrity for Welsh myth, a body of work so overly interpreted these days it has lost it's coherence in the English speaking world. I think there are easier comparisons to make between the Celtic / Germanic spheres without necessarily needing to reduce a Welsh mythological figure to an Aryan root.

Wotans Krieger said...

Having read Waddell I take it that you accept that many of his theories concerning for instance the Aryan origins of Egyptian and Sumerian civilisation are now being seen as correct in many quarters although at the time may have raised eyebrows in the stuffy halls of acadaemia.Likewise with the concept of Arthur being a lost and almost forgotten Celtic and indeed pan-Aryan sun deity.
I accept the corelation between Woden and Gwydion,an observation also made by the Folk Warder of Woden`s Folk.However there are parallels also with Lugh.
I don`t regard the analysis of Welsh or Celtic mythology as reductionism.Like it or not but Welsh mythology can like the Germanic be traced to an Aryan root and this is the essence of my blogs-to create a mythology for Aryans living in the post-xtian age.Much of our Aryan Weltanschauung was lost with the enforced xtianisation of Europe but we can recover that which was lost via study of the available materials and by exploring the Collective Racial Unconscious and being of German,English and some Welsh descent this places me in a unique position with the ability to assist in the recovery of the lost Aryan mythology of these islands in a similar manner to Tolkien.